2017 von Hövel

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When a name like Scharzhofberg is so intrinsically linked to one estate alone, it’s hard to imagine that anyone else could coax wines of any value from the same site. Well, enter von Hövel. I’ll readily admit that I’ve written about this estate often and so I apologise if I come across as repetitive. That said, the 2017 vintage is fresh on our shores.

In the Mosel, 2017 saw growers completing a trifecta of excellent, albeit very different, vintages. All three presented their own challenges but devastating April frosts might have made 2017 the most difficult of the three. Losses are reported at between 30-40% on average, though some (a few) sites were spared such a malady.

The weather did take a turn for the better in the end, though rainfall meant that disease pressure was high, and whilst BA and TBA was produced at the finest addresses, no Eiswein was made.

In comparison to the filigreed and cerebral 2016 vintage, the low yielding 2017 has produced juicer wines with concentrated and succulent fruit, high extract and firm tannins (small berries, thick skins).

If Max von Kunow’s  Feinherb and Kabinett Rieslings aren’t convincing enough then the Kabinett “S” (from the Silberberg parcel within the Krettnacher Altenberg that’s been otherwise ignored by the VDP) should turn some heads. It’s exotic, juicy and layered with sorbet like acidity bringing the wine into total harmony.

The Kabinett was the only wine from the Oberremmeler Hütte on show and was ever so slightly subdued. It has on it’s side, however, good structure and length and promises a bright future. Other than a stunning 2015 GG, I’ve not had the fortune of tasting much else from this renowned Monopollage.

Whilst the Scharzhofberger Kabinett, Spätlese and Auslese wines show beautifully in youth, they all demand and deserve considerable patience. It was the 2017 Auslese #48 (from one Fuder) that swept me off my feet. There is no denying the supreme quality of fruit here and the indulgent richness of this wine is tempered with a firm structure and vibrant acidity. The #48 promises great rewards for anyone willing to lay a few bottles down for the next 20-30 years, if not more.

Also on show were 2016 wines from Simon Bize in Savigny-lès-Beaune and 2015s ad 2016s from Robert Chevillon in Nuits-Saint-Georges. I’m a fan of both estates, Chevillon in particular. The premier cru Vergelesses from Bize was fantastic, nourishing, savoury with beautiful fruit and good line (as one would expect from a year like 2016). The Chevillon wines all showed brilliantly and I was most impressed by the 2016 (again) Bourgogne Passetoutgrain and the gorgeous 2015 premier cru Vaucrains which was characteristically dense and firm.

As I said before, I’ve written about von Hövel both often and quite recently. They’ve become one of my personal favourite addresses for supremely crystalline Saar Riesling and I’d like to see them on more dining tables in the future.

Imported into Australia by Heart & Soil.

(more) praise for von Hövel

I’ve been delighted each and every time I’ve had the good fortune of tasting these wines. Von Hövel’s Saar Rieslings have not been present in the Australian market long and I would really like to see their presence grow.

Though a decent portion of von Hövel’s wines are made in the classic ‘fruity’ style, a drier style has become an important focus since Max took up the reins in 2010. Additionally, the estate’s holdings have more that doubled since then.

2016 Saar Riesling Feinherb
The interplay between natural sweetness and brilliant acidity in this wine is a ‘case in point’ example of what the Saar does so perfectly. Though slightly muted upon opening, with just a little air this Feinherb offers a beautiful array of ripe white and yellow fruit, the acidity is mouthwatering and there is considerable length to the finish.

2016 Riesling Kabinett ‘S’
From ‘Silberberg’, a parcel in the Krettnacher Altenberg, not an official place name, but undoubtedly a fine piece of Earth. This is a beautiful Kabinett, just sweet enough and very well balanced. Another gem from the 2016 vintage. It’s unfortunate that ‘Silberberg’ is classified as a Grosse Lage site by the VDP, but the Altenberg’s brilliant terroir is not acknowledged.

2016 Riesling Scharzhofberger GG
‘A GG with 10.5% alcohol’… that sentence echoed in my mind as I mused over this elegant dry Riesling. The fruit is beautifully ripened and the finished wine is succulent and deeply layered. Sure enough, the alcohol is admirably low for a GG and consequently there’s a wonderfull weightlessness to the palate. So very fresh. One for the cellar.

2015 Riesling Scharzhofberger Auslese***
The three stars are applied much in the same way as on the Markus Molitor labels, this Auslese is made from 100% clean (no botrytis) fruit. A hypnotising and distinctly gilded bouquet. This is the product of a very warm season and you most definitely feel the added layer in ripeness, but it’s just so well balanced. Faintly smokey, reminiscent of Earl Grey tea, and also showing a savoury tone with a little air. It glides across the palate and finishes with considerable length. Of course, this is just about the greatest terroir for the Riesling grape to be found on this planet.

These wines are imported by Heart & Soil. I believe the 2017 vintage is already on the water.