Montille Pézerolles ’04

2004 Pommard 1er cru Les Pézerolles, Domaine de Montille

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Pézerolles is a premier cru in the north of Pommard close to the border with Beaune. Though Pommard wines are typically muscular, the vineyards in the north of the appellation tend to yield a Pinot Noir with considerably more finesse and perfume (Les Grands Épenots being the exception).

The wines of Domaine de Montille are made traditionally; partial de-stemming, 20-30% new oak, bottled without filtration etc… typically pure and terroir expressive… they drink beautifully when allowed enough time to grow out of their austere youth (5 years at least, but Hubert claims 20 years of patient cellaring is most ideal). Hubert de Montille,  a Beaune based lawyer, began his work at the domaine with the 1947 vintage and was among the first to begin bottling his own wines. Domaine de Montille is now run by his son Etienne and has expanded its holdings throughout the Côte de Beaune, and into the Côte de Nuits, considerably over the last couple of decades.

The general consensus with this vintage is that many wines, even at higher quality levels, hadn’t quite enough stuffing to go the distance. While the best wines are very elegant, the less fortunate are brittle and hollow, others austere and tannic. This ’04 was spared such a malady and offers a bouquet of red and black fruits, eastern spice and rose petals… what gets me is that faint aroma of tilled wet earth. It’s Pommard with a drinkability, a satin like texture to the fruit that is more Beaune… or Volnay?

Welcome Von Hövel!

Imagine my delight recently when I learned that Weingut Von Hövel’s wines have made it to Australia all the way from the Saar. Importer Heart & Soil had a few wines open for a tasting at the French Saloon recently, alongside new releases from Keller, Wagner-Stempel (Rheinhessen) and some very fine reds and whites from Ziereisen (Baden).

Von Hövel is based in Konz-Oberemmel in the Saar (not far from Wiltingen), they own the Oberemmeler Hütte in its entirety and also have holdings in the Scharzhofberg and other well-known sites like the Kanzemer Hörecker; The Hütte site has the same south by south-east exposition as the Scharzhofberg. Maximilian von Kunow took over the estate after his father Eberhard suffered a stroke in 2010. Maximilian has continued the fruity Saar style made by his father but has also introduced dry-tasting Saar Rieslings too.

Both the 2016 Saar Riesling and Saar Riesling trocken are fine examples of their style; clean and bright, elegant and mineral. These are classically light-footed Saar wines and I hope to see them appear on wine bar/restaurant lists over the summer.

The 2015 Oberemmler Hütte GG will divide opinion; there is a fair amount of skin contact here (I initially suspected some botrytis but I am assured that the dry, off-dry and GG wines are fungus free) and the wine is both fruit and tannin rich, plenty of dried apricot, orange rind, black tea etc. A meditation wine indeed, this will very generously reward some cellaring, give it 5-7 years at least and in excess of a decade if you have the patience.

The wine that really grabbed me was the 2015 Scharzhofberger Kabinett. This was supremely fine, filigreed, flavoursome and long and will take years to unfurl. The interplay between sugar and acidity approaches perfection, a stunning Kabinett from a legendary vineyard site. Drink a bottle now and then lay a few down for a another 5 years at least. I will be.

On another note, as I write I am drinking a 2015 Immich-Batterieberg C.A.I. Riesling Kabinett. This is quite simply one of the best value dry Mosel Rieslings I have tried to date. The labelling Kabinett makes a point about chaptalisation. There’s uniform ripeness here, much fruit and spice and bracing acidity. I believe some fruit from the lower portion of the Enkircher Batterieberg makes it in to this wine, joined by some fruit from the Saar too… I could be wrong. I will be drinking this in place of water over the summer months.

A strong case for terroir!

Heymann-Löwenstein

There can be few, if any, winemakers in the Mosel with as inimitable a style as Reinhard Löwenstein of Winningen. As the address suggests, Bahnhofstrasse 10 is right by the train station; the impressive art nouveau house built in 1888 was joined recently by a giant concrete cube containing the winemaking facility and the two buildings are joined underground by the cellar. All manner of design concepts are employed here, including Fung Shui and Pablo Neruda’s poetry.

Winningen is in the Lower Mosel, just outside the city of Koblenz. The climate here is warmer than in the Middle Mosel and the wines somewhat sturdier. It is here, primarily from the Uhlen site, that these wines are made. He also has holdings in the Röttgen, other Winningen sites and in Hatzenport further upstream. Reinhard divides the Winninger Uhlen into three unique terroirs: Blaufußerlay (blue-grey slate), Laubach (dark chalky slate) and Roth Lay (red, quartzite laden, silty slate). Heymann-Löwenstein cultivates 14.5 ha in total.

For all intents and purposes the wines of this estate should be treated and drunk as dry wines even if they are not ‘legally trocken’. Reinhard harvests late and must weights are at the higher level, some must oxidation is deliberately encouraged, fermentations occur naturally, and the juice is settled, not fined, before racking into one of his many Doppelstück where they remain until the following harvest. The resultant wines are a truly cerebral drinking experience; they are far from ‘classic’ Mosel, but this doesn’t detract one bit from their quality. Only noble sweet wines are bottled with a Prädikat here.

The Roth Lay and Laubach I enjoyed recently are not current release but from the 2014 vintage. Perhaps it’s worth mentioning that one of these sessions included a bottle of 2007 Prager Kaiserberg Riesling Smaragd from the Wachau; ‘gilded’ and ‘beguiling’ were among the ostentatious words thrown around the table. Last year, visiting with my father (who was most impressed), I had the great fortune of tasting the 2015 Heymann-Löwenstein vintage while still in barrel. The 2016 wines I am yet to have the pleasure of encountering.

There’s a distinctive and very tactile ferrous nature to the wines of the Roth Lay portion of the Uhlen site. The wines are deep and multi-layered and the aroma to me is somewhat ochre, or red-toned. This already drinks beautifully, with intensity, with grace; full, firm and yet gleaming, quartz like. The Laubach I found to have a refined opulence about it with a fairly exotic, yellow fruit touch, it continued to evolve, kaleidoscope-like, over the course of dinner and drank thoroughly well with duck… I was however in special company and not really taking notes. ‘Blaufußerlay’ I haven’t tasted in over a year but I find it the most delicate or discreet of the three.

The Heymann-Löwenstein Schieferterrassen Riesling is not to be scoffed at and if you happen upon the very fragrant Pinot Noir vom Schiefer (made in collaboration with Hanspeter Ziereisen of Baden) then do not pass up the opportunity to drink a bottle.

Reinhard Löwenstein is a fiercely opinionated man, however as one listens to him speak, you get the impression that his views are formulated very intelligently. If his wisdom alone is not enough then let his wines do the talking, they make a strong case for terroir! I’ll get to the punchline because I’d like to make a point. When it comes to ‘dry’ Riesling of this pedigree I find comparisons with white Burgundy (often made by journalists) to totally debase their value.